Earn Money Posting in Forums
ancientpeoples: Ancient Philippine scripts are... | Express Yourself!

Express Yourself!

Welcome to My Tumblr Blog
I am Treathyl FOX, aka CMoneyspinner, Texas-based Freelance Writer; Investor, Home Business Entrepreneur. Visit the “About the Publisher” page, if you're curious to know more. Very happy you stopped by. Come again often. You are welcome here!


Free xml sitemap generator

Bloglist24



Visit Cmoneyspinner's profile on Pinterest.
Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like
Who I Follow




ancientpeoples:

Ancient Philippine scripts are systems of writing that developed and flourished in the Philippine islands in about 300 BC. These scripts are related to other Southeast Asian systems of writing that developed from South Indian Brahmi scripts used in Asoka Inscriptions and Pallava Grantha, a type of writing used in the writing of palm leaf books called grantha during the ascendancy of the Pallava dynasty about the 5th century.
Isaac Taylor sought to show that the system of writing, particularly the Baybayin script, was introduced into the Philippines from the Coast of Bengal sometime before the 8th century. In attempting to show such relationship, Taylor presented graphic representations of Kistna and Assam letters like g, k, ng, t, m, h, and u, which resemble the same letters in Baybayin.
Fletcher Gardner argued that the Philippine scripts have “very great similarity” with the Asoka alphabets. T. H. Pardo de Tavera supported Gardner’s view, and he also wrote that “the ancient Filipino alphabets have resemblance with the characters of the Asokan inscriptions.” David Diringer, accepting the view that the alphabets of the Indonesian archipelago have their origins from India, opined that these, particularly that which is used in the Ci-Aruton inscriptions of the West Javan rajah, King Purnavarman, constituted the earliest types of Philippine syllabic writing. These according to Diringer were brought to the Islands through the Buginese characters in Celebes. The script would fall within the middle of the 5th century.
The Dravidian influence on the ancient Filipino scripts was obviously of Tamil origin,” wrote V. A. Makarenko, in proposing another view on the origin of Philippine scripts. Based primarily on the work of H. Otley Beyer, this theory argues that these scripts reached the Philippines via the last of the “six waves of migration that passed through the Philippine archipelago from the Asian continent about 200 BC,” constituting the Malayans and Dravidians, “primarily the Tamil from Malaya and the adjacent territories and from Indonesia and South India as well.”
The early Filipinos wrote on many different materials; leaves, palm fronds, tree bark and fruit rinds, but the most common material was bamboo. The writing tools or panulat were the points of daggers or small pieces of iron. Once the letters were carved into the bamboo, it was wiped with ash to make the characters stand out more. Sharpened splits of bamboo were used with coloured plant saps to write on more delicate materials such as leaves.
Much earlier writing techniques were also devised by early Filipinos, dating 900 AD. The Philippine copperplate was inscribed by hammering the letters onto the metal using a sharp instrument. The letters show closely joined and overlapping dots from the hammering.

ancientpeoples:

Ancient Philippine scripts are systems of writing that developed and flourished in the Philippine islands in about 300 BC. These scripts are related to other Southeast Asian systems of writing that developed from South Indian Brahmi scripts used in Asoka Inscriptions and Pallava Grantha, a type of writing used in the writing of palm leaf books called grantha during the ascendancy of the Pallava dynasty about the 5th century.

Isaac Taylor sought to show that the system of writing, particularly the Baybayin script, was introduced into the Philippines from the Coast of Bengal sometime before the 8th century. In attempting to show such relationship, Taylor presented graphic representations of Kistna and Assam letters like g, k, ng, t, m, h, and u, which resemble the same letters in Baybayin.

Fletcher Gardner argued that the Philippine scripts have “very great similarity” with the Asoka alphabets. T. H. Pardo de Tavera supported Gardner’s view, and he also wrote that “the ancient Filipino alphabets have resemblance with the characters of the Asokan inscriptions.” David Diringer, accepting the view that the alphabets of the Indonesian archipelago have their origins from India, opined that these, particularly that which is used in the Ci-Aruton inscriptions of the West Javan rajah, King Purnavarman, constituted the earliest types of Philippine syllabic writing. These according to Diringer were brought to the Islands through the Buginese characters in Celebes. The script would fall within the middle of the 5th century.

The Dravidian influence on the ancient Filipino scripts was obviously of Tamil origin,” wrote V. A. Makarenko, in proposing another view on the origin of Philippine scripts. Based primarily on the work of H. Otley Beyer, this theory argues that these scripts reached the Philippines via the last of the “six waves of migration that passed through the Philippine archipelago from the Asian continent about 200 BC,” constituting the Malayans and Dravidians, “primarily the Tamil from Malaya and the adjacent territories and from Indonesia and South India as well.”

The early Filipinos wrote on many different materials; leaves, palm fronds, tree bark and fruit rinds, but the most common material was bamboo. The writing tools or panulat were the points of daggers or small pieces of iron. Once the letters were carved into the bamboo, it was wiped with ash to make the characters stand out more. Sharpened splits of bamboo were used with coloured plant saps to write on more delicate materials such as leaves.

Much earlier writing techniques were also devised by early Filipinos, dating 900 AD. The Philippine copperplate was inscribed by hammering the letters onto the metal using a sharp instrument. The letters show closely joined and overlapping dots from the hammering.

(via asianhistory)

  1. felinedatabase reblogged this from asianhistory
  2. aguhon reblogged this from fyfilipinopride
  3. pop-octopus reblogged this from univer-shitty
  4. univer-shitty reblogged this from fyfilipinopride
  5. fyfilipinopride reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  6. bunan-tsokolatte reblogged this from fyfilipinopride
  7. my-sweet-sansrival reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  8. lilolo003 reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  9. sasstapor reblogged this from stannisbaratheon
  10. bleedingmagenta reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  11. gregoriodelpilar reblogged this from stannisbaratheon
  12. huntersons reblogged this from stannisbaratheon
  13. impossiblepolymath reblogged this from asianhistory
  14. avinteriors reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  15. digitaldesperados reblogged this from asianhistory
  16. invictascientia reblogged this from asianhistory
  17. storyofmyownlife reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  18. lakhsonlakhsonlakhs reblogged this from bookeofhowrs
  19. jv-ong reblogged this from asianhistory
  20. avibus-libri reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  21. butnotquite reblogged this from stannisbaratheon
  22. peaceloveandafropuffs reblogged this from poc-creators
  23. poc-creators reblogged this from bakethatlinguist
  24. katterrena reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  25. girlwiththelionstail reblogged this from stannisbaratheon
  26. conscientious-layman reblogged this from ancientpeoples
  27. historicalwhatsits reblogged this from ancientpeoples



Cmoneyspinner Around the Web

↑ Grab this Headline Animator



Join Amazon Prime - Watch Over 40,000 Movies and TV Shows Anytime - Start Free Trial Now




comments powered by Disqus